South Carolina Council of Teachers of Mathematics

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Welcome to the Dine and Discuss Forum

  • January 26, 2020 9:28 PM
    Message # 8691014
    Anonymous member (Administrator)

    Welcome to the Dine and Discuss Discussion Forum


    During the months between the two in-person meetings, we will support a discussion thread on the SCCTM.org website to continue the amazing conversation among professionals and colleagues across our amazing state! As such, teachers are able to earn Continue Education Credits for each Dine & Discuss event and monthly discussion thread in which they participate. 



    Last modified: January 26, 2020 9:45 PM | Anonymous member (Administrator)
  • March 26, 2020 9:40 AM
    Reply # 8859927 on 8691014
    Anonymous member (Administrator)

    In these CrAzY times, what are some great "Jo Boaler" suggested ideas from Limitless Mind that we, while not in a classroom, are able to encourage while we are unable to be with our students physically? (If you can reference a page in the book, that's even better!)

  • April 07, 2020 9:56 AM
    Reply # 8883536 on 8691014

    Teaching the Value of Mistakes is a subsection early in the book(p 55). This resonates as it is #2 on the Growth Mindset list of norms, file attached. We are used to praising students for correct answers but most learning comes from the process of making a mistake and the ensuing struggle. Learning from mistakes is a strategy that can be done in any environment.  Click here to find other resources in addition to the norms poster. 


    A specific strategy to reinforce mistakes as part of learning is My Favorite No. Click here for an introduction of one way to use the strategy in a safe and useful manner. The first time I ever did this I gave the problem to all the teachers in my grade level and pulled my favorite no from there to show students we will all make mistakes. 

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  • April 15, 2020 1:12 PM
    Reply # 8901697 on 8883536
    Anonymous
    Anonymous wrote:

    Teaching the Value of Mistakes is a subsection early in the book(p 55). This resonates as it is #2 on the Growth Mindset list of norms, file attached. We are used to praising students for correct answers but most learning comes from the process of making a mistake and the ensuing struggle. Learning from mistakes is a strategy that can be done in any environment.  Click here to find other resources in addition to the norms poster. 


    A specific strategy to reinforce mistakes as part of learning is My Favorite No. Click here for an introduction of one way to use the strategy in a safe and useful manner. The first time I ever did this I gave the problem to all the teachers in my grade level and pulled my favorite no from there to show students we will all make mistakes. 

    I agree that making mistakes is so critical to the learning process.  I also know, from personal experience, that overcoming the fear of making mistakes is very difficult.  I know it talks about our school systems (p.56) are set up "to give students tests that penalize them every time they make a mistake."  As a teacher, I always like to point out my errors for students--to show that everyone makes them and they are part of the process and its not the end of the world!  But, I think that seeing mistakes as a positive thing, takes lots of time and reinforcement.

  • April 15, 2020 1:26 PM
    Reply # 8901712 on 8691014
    Anonymous

    Honestly, I am trying all sorts of ways to communicate with my math intervention students.  Yes, it is fun to come up with multiple ways to communicate:  videos, email, fun on-line field trips, sending pictures, writing personal letters, zooming, etc. 


    But, a quote on p. 93 kind of stands out to me--it isn't a strategy as it is just trying to model positivity in the face of uncertainty:

    "When people change their mindset and become aware of the positive benefits of struggle, they take a new and much more positive approach to challenge and uncertainty.  They let go of the need to be the expert and replace it with curiosity and the desire to collaborate."


    So in all my communication, I am trying to show that I am just like them and that we are all in this together--finding fun things to do, enjoying this time with the people that mean the most, exploring new ideas (like how to create a video!), and encouraging them to make the most of the current situation. 

  • April 15, 2020 4:32 PM
    Reply # 8902131 on 8901712
    Anonymous
    Anonymous wrote:

    Honestly, I am trying all sorts of ways to communicate with my math intervention students.  Yes, it is fun to come up with multiple ways to communicate:  videos, email, fun on-line field trips, sending pictures, writing personal letters, zooming, etc. 


    But, a quote on p. 93 kind of stands out to me--it isn't a strategy as it is just trying to model positivity in the face of uncertainty:

    "When people change their mindset and become aware of the positive benefits of struggle, they take a new and much more positive approach to challenge and uncertainty.  They let go of the need to be the expert and replace it with curiosity and the desire to collaborate."


    So in all my communication, I am trying to show that I am just like them and that we are all in this together--finding fun things to do, enjoying this time with the people that mean the most, exploring new ideas (like how to create a video!), and encouraging them to make the most of the current situation. 


    I also tried to create a quick low floor, high ceiling activity with my students.  Boaler mentions this in Chapter 4 and I just completed a virtual math workshop with Sue O'Connell and she discusses benefits of these activities as well.   Let me know your thoughts.  Hopefully, I will receive a few responses from my students!

    COLORFUL PICNIC BLANKET


    Mrs. Babinchak is sewing a picnic blanket made of colorful rectangles.


    I count 16 rectangles.  Am I right?  Why or why not?


    Please respond to this email with your answer.  You may need to draw out your thinking on paper.  Have fun with this!

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  • April 20, 2020 1:01 PM
    Reply # 8911140 on 8691014
    Anonymous

    Yes, about the quote on p. 93- What a critical change it mindset, "to become aware of the positive benefits of struggle." As we are not physically with our students we have to be creative in our approaches with regard to the assignments they have at home.  Creative videos, Zoom, phone calls of reassurance.  And it has become even more important to help parents understand this.  They are under a lot of pressure and uncertainty.

  • April 21, 2020 1:14 PM
    Reply # 8914324 on 8859927
    Anonymous
    Anonymous wrote:

    In these CrAzY times, what are some great "Jo Boaler" suggested ideas from Limitless Mind that we, while not in a classroom, are able to encourage while we are unable to be with our students physically? (If you can reference a page in the book, that's even better!)


    Chapter 5 begins by addressing the myth "that to be good at math or any other subject, you need to be a fast thinker."  I think this might be a good question to pose to my students.  I have decided to come up with another interactive form of communication and will try FlipGrid with my math intervention students.  Since April is Math Awareness Month, I was going to read a couple of books about mathematicians.  One book describes how this young boy was a whiz with numbers and could do difficult calculations in his head with ease.  After reading this part, I thought it might send the wrong messages to students and that it would be a good point of discussion--to be good at math do you have to be fast?
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  • June 02, 2020 5:36 PM
    Reply # 9010532 on 8691014

    Chapter 6: A Limitless Approach to Collaboration contains a section which when I read previously stuck out but with current events, is more relevant. Dr. Boaler ties collaboration to three actions we can move toward. This happens on many levels but key components for moving to positive interactions depend on 3 things: opening minds, opening content, and embracing uncertainty. 


    Section (1) Opening Minds is what I want to refer to now. She states "..one of the goals of schools should be to produce citizens who treat each other with respect, who value the contributions of others with whom they interact, irrespective of race, class, or gender, and who act with a sense of justice, considering the needs of others in society. "


    Later in the section, she mentions research about fixed versus growth mindset and how people see themselves and one another. Fixed see themselves as not being able to change, therefore others cant change as well. This is in contrast to the growth who can learn from mistakes and can see others as making poor choices but can still grow.  


    Collaboration starts with the open-mindedness of differences in how we think, how people think differently, different perspectives, and accepting these differences. 


    There are two more actions but this one seemed like a fitting place to start. 





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